What Happens to Your Body When You’re Stressed – Part 1

Have you heard the phrase, “stress is a killer”.  Surely, that phrase should be a wake up call to get a handle on stress. But, unfortunately, most of us wear stress like a comfortable pair of old shoes.

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, two-thirds of office visits to family doctors are for stress-related symptoms such as fatigue, body aches, obesity and heart palpitations.

These are stressful times for all of us and coupled with our day-to-day stressors, we can easily become affected by stressful symptoms.

When you  have a gazillion things on your to-do-list, you’re overwhelmed by the demands on your time, and can’t take a minute just for yourself,  your body will respond to these stressors as though you are in danger. Your heart rate increases, your breathing becomes faster, and you get a sudden burst of energy. This is known as the fight-or-flight response.  This response is fine if you are in actually in danger.  But, just imagine feeling this way several times a day for days on end.

Consider traffic jams, deadlines, eating on the run, bills to pay, job changes, family and community obligations, endless chores and errands, and demands and more demands on your time, and energy.  That’s the reality for most of us, most days.

How  would you feel if you could take care of everything you have to do and still carve out some time for self-care?

You don’t have to let stress rule your life.

In the next post, I’ll share with you the four areas of your life where stress takes a serious toll.

Gladys Anderson - Life Coach, Therapist, Author

 

 

Gladys Anderson, founder of Coach for YOUR Dreams, is a certified life coach, licensed marriage and family therapist, writer and speaker. Gladys combines years of experience, training and a genuine commitment to helping nurses, teachers, therapists and other care giving women to set limits so they have more time, and energy to devote to self-care.

 

 

 

 

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